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You are here : eLibrary : IAHR World Congress Proceedings : 36th Congress - The Hague (2015) ALL CONTENT : Extreme events, natural variability and climate change : Climate and landuse change impacts on sub-sea level rice farming in a tropical
Climate and landuse change impacts on sub-sea level rice farming in a tropical
Author : K.G. SREEJA(1), C.G. MADHUSOODHANAN(2), T.I. ELDHO(3)
ABSTRACT
Sub-sea level paddy farming system practiced 2-3 meters below sea level in the fertile Kuttanad delta situated in the west
coast of peninsular India is a unique and globally important agricultural heritage system. This vast tropical estuarine
complex is drained by five Western Ghat rivers and is also part of the largest Ramsar site in India. The present study
investigates the historic trends in landuse and climate on agricultural production from this unique wetland paddy system
over the past 48 years (1966-2014). A supervised classification of Landsat images revealed the drastic changes to
landuse in the delta over the past four decades. Two distinct phases of land reclamation are identified: reclamation of land
from the natural wetland estuaries for paddy cultivation as well as the more recent paddy land conversions into uplands.
The statistical trend analysis of climate variables of temperature and precipitation on paddy yield for the time period in the
region revealed weak and insignificant impacts of warming climate on agricultural production from this wetland system. It
is observed that in the near term, anthropogenic land use changes have stronger significant impacts on the delta than the
impacts of climate change. Such a historical assessment of observed data on climate and landuse is critical for devising
sustainable strategies and adaptive mechanisms for the conservation of this valuable agricultural system.
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Chapter : IAHR World Congress Proceedings
Category : 36th Congress - The Hague (2015) ALL CONTENT
Article : Extreme events, natural variability and climate change
Date Published : 20/08/2015
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