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You are here : eLibrary : IAHR World Congress Proceedings : 34th Congress - Brisbane (2011) : THEME 4: Responding to Shifting Water Resources : Wildfire impact on water yield within sydney's drinking water supply catchments: a preliminary asses...
Wildfire impact on water yield within sydney's drinking water supply catchments: a preliminary assessment of the 2001/2002 outer sydney basin wildfires
Author : Jessica Heath1, Chris J. Chafer2 and Tom Bishop1
Wildfire is a recurring event which has been acknowledged by various pieces of literature to impact the hydrological cycle of a catchment. This can have a significant impact on the water yield levels of a river system. Studies within Australia have been limited which is why the outer Sydney 2001/ 2002 wildfires provided the opportunity to investigate the impacts of wildfire on water yield. The overall aim of this study is to determine if there is a significant difference in the rainfall- water yield relationship between the pre- and post-wildfire periods, hence a significant difference in water yield. Four burnt sub-catchments and 3 control sub-catchments were assessed. An Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA) was implemented into this study to account for differences in rainfall between the pre- and post-wildfire period. All burnt catchments experienced a significant difference in their water yield levels or in the case of the Erskine Creek and Nattai River sub-catchments there was a significant difference in their rainfall-water yield relationships. The control catchments experienced different results with Grose River catchment having no significant differences in water yield. Kedumba River sub-catchment encountered a significant difference in its water yield levels, whilst Kowmung River sub-catchment obtained a significant difference in its rainfall-water yield relationship.
File Size : 923,343 bytes
File Type : Adobe Acrobat Document
Chapter : IAHR World Congress Proceedings
Category : 34th Congress - Brisbane (2011)
Article : THEME 4: Responding to Shifting Water Resources
Date Published : 01/07/2011
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