IAHR, founded in 1935, is a worldwide independent member-based organisation of engineers and water specialists working in fields related to the hydro-environmental sciences and their practical application. Activities range from river and maritime hydraulics to water resources development and eco-hydraulics, through to ice engineering, hydroinformatics, and hydraulic machinery.
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You are here : eLibrary : IAHR World Congress Proceedings : 34th Congress - Brisbane (2011) : THEME 5: Environmental Hydraulics and Hydrology : Effects of large water level fluctuations on water quality in subtropical reservoirs
Effects of large water level fluctuations on water quality in subtropical reservoirs
Author : R.K. Laursen1, B. Gibbes1, A. Grinham1, D. Gale1,2, J. Udy2 and D. Lockington1
South East Queensland is one of six regions in Australia expected to be highly impacted by predicted future climate change. The annual precipitation is likely to decline and rainfall patterns are expected to shift with more intense rainfall events separated by longer dry periods. These shifting patterns are likely to induce more frequent and larger water level fluctuations in water supply reservoirs than are currently experienced. The implications of these fluctuations for reservoir water quality are unclear. In this study a combination of field measurements and numerical simulations are used to investigate how large water level fluctuations may affect the mixing between the epilimnion and hypolimnion, as well as overall water quality in a small subtropical reservoir. The implications of such water level variations for water resource managers are discussed.
File Size : 635,845 bytes
File Type : Adobe Acrobat Document
Chapter : IAHR World Congress Proceedings
Category : 34th Congress - Brisbane (2011)
Article : THEME 5: Environmental Hydraulics and Hydrology
Date Published : 01/07/2011
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